Spray can

Working with a spray can yourself can give a good result. But sometimes it degenerates into a spray can.

A nice job, a quiet preparation. A satisfied person. With another 1 glance over the freshly placed part in the spray can, the amateur sprayer turned off the garage light and closed the barn door.

The following morning he saw this:

The original lacquer layer was already repainted. Then apparently something had already happened, because there were some ice floe structures in that paint. Pretty nice actually. But it wasn't the intention.

When spraying dust after sanding, our sprayer had used bio alcohol. He had noticed that the bottom layer gave off a strong color and that the top layer of the old paint seemed to become soft, seemed to 'melt'.

But after setting up the primer and the varnish, everything was really beautiful.

But apparently the underlying lacquer layer was a cheap synthetic resin lacquer layer. And that kind of lacquer just about permanently evaporates its plasticizer. That plasticizer then works on the surface finish.

The result is a lacquer layer with cracks like in an ice floor ...

Consult your local paint specialist first for your spraying work. Try what happens in a place that is less visible than a tank. Or see if you can order a cleaning special from us. It also says a lot about lacquers.

 

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